Archaeology, Place Names and Runic Inscriptions versus Literary Sources to the Pre-Christian Beliefs and Customs of Scandinavia

This post is an addition to an article I wrote about The Literary Sources before. I was then concentrating on my main field of expertise, namely the Literary Sources. That does not mean there are no other sources of value. In this article, I will try to show how the different sources work best when … Continue reading Archaeology, Place Names and Runic Inscriptions versus Literary Sources to the Pre-Christian Beliefs and Customs of Scandinavia

The Literary Sources we have to Pre-Christian Scandinavian Culture and Religious Beliefs

“…we believe that if we surely know the truth about our ancestors, we may more easily oppose the scorn of foreigners when they declare that we descend from bandits and slaves… However everything is, all civilized nations wish to know the origins of their own society and about the establishment of their own lineages.” Landnámabók … Continue reading The Literary Sources we have to Pre-Christian Scandinavian Culture and Religious Beliefs

The Indo-European Migrations

For a long time, the only evidence we had of an ancient, proto-Indo-European culture was the fact that many European and Asian languages evidently belonged to the same family, sharing a basic grammatical structure and etymology. By the method of comparative linguistics, scholars since the 19th century have been working on comparing languages in order … Continue reading The Indo-European Migrations

Snorri´s Ancestral Stories about the “Men from Asia”

In Snorri Sturluson´s Prologue to the Prose Edda, as well as in his Ynglinga saga [the first chapter of Heimskringla, the Sagas of the Norwegian Kings], this Medieval Icelandic historian claimed that the Aesir, gods of the Norse pagan pantheon, in reality were ancestors from Asia who had once entered North-Western Europe and whose language, … Continue reading Snorri´s Ancestral Stories about the “Men from Asia”